Malaysia International Guan Gong Cultural Festival / 2018馬來西亞國際關公文化節

I believe this was a procession for the Malaysia International Guan Gong Cultural Festival / 2018馬來西亞國際關公文化節: http://beta.orientaldaily.com.my/s/265308. The procession would have started in Chinatown/Petaling Street and went all the way to Tong Kat Shin, Changkat and Jalan Alor tonight – I did not know what festival it was as someone I asked did not speak good English! In Chinese folk religion, Guan Yu https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guan_Yu is widely referred to as “Emperor Guan” (關帝; Guāndì) and “Duke Guan” (關公; Guān Gōng), while his Taoist title is “Holy Emperor Lord Guan” (關聖帝君; Guān Shèng Dì Jūn). In the Western world, Guan Yu is sometimes called the Taoist God of War, probably because he is one of the most well-known military generals worshipped by the Chinese people. This is a misconception of his role, as, unlike the Greco-Roman deity Mars or the Norse god Týr, Guan Yu, as a god, does not necessarily bless those who go to battle, but rather people who observe the code of brotherhood and righteousness. Guan Yu (died January or February 220), courtesy name Yunchang, was a general serving under the warlord Liu Bei in the late Eastern Han dynasty. He played a significant role in the events that led to the end of the dynasty and the establishment of the state of Shu Han – founded by Liu Bei – in the Three Kingdoms period. After Liu Bei gained control of Yi Province in 214, Guan Yu remained in Jing Province to govern and defend the area for about seven years. In 219, while he was away fighting Cao Cao’s forces at the Battle of Fancheng, Liu Bei’s ally Sun Quan broke the Sun–Liu alliance and sent his general Lü Meng to invade and conquer Liu Bei’s territories in Jing Province in a stealth operation. By the time Guan Yu found out about the loss of Jing Province after his defeat at Fancheng, it was too late. He was subsequently captured in an ambush by Sun Quan’s forces and executed. As one of the best known Chinese historical figures throughout East Asia, Guan Yu’s true life stories have largely given way to fictionalised ones, most of which are found in the 14th-century historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms or passed down the generations, in which his deeds and moral qualities have been lionised. Guan Yu is respected as an epitome of loyalty and righteousness. He is portrayed as having a red face.

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